Mayor Ganim Fights for Bridgeport’s Full Car Tax Reimbursement

This article originally appeared on Eyewitness News 3.

 

Taxpayers took their concerns to the state capitol on Wednesday.

Residents from three towns are saying enough is enough.

They're being short-changed millions of dollars because of changes in the car tax reimbursement.

This only affects three towns, but residents that live in these towns are losing a significant amount of money.

They fell through the cracks with some of the changes and it raises taxes and forces some layoffs.

"This particular issue has put us over the edge,” said Kyle Blake, a Hamden taxpayer.

Blake said Hamden has been getting less in state aid, but this latest cut is too much.

Towns get reimbursed for a portion of their mill rate.

It used to be anything over 37 that was changed to 45, but what lawmakers didn't account for was that three towns Hamden, Torrington, and Bridgeport just had re-evaluations, which caused their mill rates to go up.

Hamden is owed $2 million, Torrington nearly $1.5 million. and Bridgeport is owed $7 million.

"Our three towns did what they were supposed to do, followed the rules, did reevaluations, as difficult as it was, and got left behind,” said Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim.

"All three towns, alliance district towns, towns with significant needs in education, public education, lost millions of dollars,” said Representative Mike D’Agostino of Hamden.

D'Agostino said the town has already had three furlough days in the school system and could be forced to lay off teachers.

"It adds to the contouring short-fall of monies coming from the state. It's going to raise our taxes, we are going to end up losing jobs, losing services, municipalities just can't take this anymore,” Blake said.

The towns are now urging lawmakers to do something.

The House budget that passed appropriations does put back some of the money, however, the entry budget still needs to be negotiated and voted on.

This article originally appeared on Eyewitness News 3.